Fellowship

We believe that a reading of the Biblical evidence shows that God intends small groups to be a key element in His plan. Christ concentrated on just 12 men – and with those 12, He changed the world. The early church was a small group church – it started in small groups – Luke describes homes being used for: – Prayer meetings (Acts 12:12), Fellowship (Acts 21:7) Communion (Acts 2:26), Teaching, worship, prayer (Acts 20:7), Follow-up (Acts 18:26) and Teaching (Acts 5:42). We also read of household groups/churches at the homes of Priscilla and Aquilla (Romans 16:5), and Nympha (Colossians 4:15). Note also Philemon vv 1,2“Paul, a prisoner of Christ Jesus, and Timothy our brother, To Philemon our dear friend and fellow worker, to Apphia our sister, to Archippus our fellow soldier and to the church that meets in your home”

The small group was an integral part of both the practice and the strategy of the first believers – they followed their Lord’s example in building one another up in the faith as they gathered together. In addition, Small groups have also played a key role in many of the major revival movements throughout history, for example, The Franciscan order; The Anabaptists; Moravians; Quakers; Methodism; Lutherans; House Church. It also seems as if the only churches in the UK which are growing nowadays are those which have a small group strategy.

We believe that it is in small groups that people are able to form deeper relationships with one another, encourage and build up one another, exercise gifts and ministries, apply the Word, and reach out in a much more low-key and non threatening way to friends, neighbours and colleagues. The small group is where you can put into practice the “nitty gritty” of Christianity, it is “where the rubber hits the road”. It is a discipleship and caring structure that is designed to help church members to grow in their faith and in their fellowship.

Therefore at the Seed, the small group is considered to be a vital element of living our lives as Christians with one another. When joining us, it is understood that becoming a part of us includes committing to joining and contributing into a small group.